Keep a record of the supplements you take in one place, just as you should be doing for all of your medicines. Note the specific product name, the dose you take, how often you take it, and the reason why you use each one. You can also bring the products you use with you, when you see your health care provider. The FDA provides a useful form, ”My Medicine Record external link disclaimer”, to record the medicines and dietary supplements that you take. Share this form with your healthcare provider to discuss what’s best for your overall health.

Federal Regulation of Dietary Supplements

The FDA is the federal agency that oversees both dietary supplements and medicines.

Dietary supplements are products intended to supplement the diet. They are not drugs and, are not intended to treat, diagnose, mitigate, prevent, or cure diseases

The FDA regulations for dietary supplements are different from those for prescription or over-the-counter drugs.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not determine whether dietary supplements are effective before they are marketed.

While the supplement company is responsible for having evidence that their products are safe and the label claims are truthful and not misleading, they do not have to provide that evidence to the FDA before the product is marketed. Unlike drugs, which must be approved by the FDA before they can be marketed, dietary supplements do not require premarket review or approval by the FDA.

Dietary supplement labels may carry certain types of health-related claims.

Manufacturers are permitted to say, that a dietary supplement addresses a nutrient deficiency, supports health, or is linked to a particular body function (like immunity or heart health).

Such a claim must be followed by the words, “This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.”

If the FDA finds a product to be unsafe or otherwise unfit for human consumption, it may take enforcement action to remove the product from the marketplace or work with the manufacturer to voluntarily recall the product.

Manufacturers must follow certain good manufacturing practices to ensure the identity, purity, strength, and composition of their products.

The Federal Trade Commission, which polices product advertising, also requires all information about a dietary supplement product to be truthful and not misleading.

The FDA monitors information on the product’s label and package insert to make sure that information about the supplement’s content is accurate and that any claims made for the product are truthful and not misleading, once a dietary supplement is on the market.

If a company promotes a dietary supplement as treatments or cures for diseases, or if their products are unsafe, then the federal government can take legal action against companies and Web sites that sell dietary supplements when the companies make false or deceptive statements about their products.

This data is a summarized research of public information made available on the internet.

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